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A ghostly look: my phosphorescent DSLR

I’m a big fan of unusual things. The more unusual the better. Besides a red (link) and a black Nikon D70, I have now sprayed a model with phosphorescent paint. In contrast to fluorescent paint, it is self-luminous in the dark – provided that the painting has been stimulated with light beforehand.

The greenish glow is rather weak, but still clearly visible in the dark.

The corresponding proof picture will be delivered later, as soon as I have found a good light source and the camera connector of the tripod, so I can shoot a decent photo in the dark.

 
Phosphorescent DSLR

Phosphorescent DSLR

Phosphorescent DSLR

Infrared Rainbow

Ever wondered what an infrared rainbow looks like?

Only for about a quarter of an hour, shortly before disappearing on the horizon, the sun shone yesterday. And in doing so – after hours of rain – conjured up a rainbow on the dense cloud background over Thun.

 
Rainbow in Infrared

 
I used a filter combination that lets through a little visible and IR, about 700 nanometers. The infrared rainbow is mainly white, but you can still see a little color at its edges.

The image reminds me of a painting by Caspar David Friedrich, one of my favorite painters, who is also a great inspiration for my pictures. It is called “Mountain Landscape with Rainbow”.

The painting is dreamlike-surreal, as it combines day and night. One sees at the same time a seemingly moonlit night sky and a sunlit hill with a hiker. Above it shines the rainbow, which is colorful only when viewed up close. The opposites of day and night are unified by the rainbow, which, according to Wikipedia, “symbolizes the covenant between God and humanity in the Genesis account of Noah’s Ark.” (link)

 
Rainbow in Infrared

 
How nice that would be to photograph an infrared rainbow in the mountains. Or over a lake. In this case, the Thun military barracks serve as a complementary element.

Nikon D70 IR Black edition

I also made a black version of the Nikon D70 IR. Cool how the black shade matches the Nikon black perfectly. I removed the Nikon logo for aesthetic reasons and more blackness. How I did that? Sanding it down with appropriate paper. I’ll probably convert it to a “Simon Marsden”-style deep black (monochrome) IR camera with 900nm or 1000nm filter and fog filter (for the glow effect). Let’s see if that works out.

 
Nikon D70 IR

Only the moon and me

Astrophotography seems like a good hobby to me. My girlfriend’s father gave me his old telescope some time ago. I, as a technophobe, had a long time trouble to assemble the bulky thing. I lacked the patience. But a few nights ago, after seeing the moon and how it shone beautifully from the night sky, I wanted to know.

The moment when you first look at the moon up close through a telescope is difficult to describe. Unbelievable actually, that we are sailing on a sphere somewhere through infinite blackness. And that the moon and stars exist. I saw craters in absolute sharpness. It’s a moment that gives you peace and makes you look at life from a different angle. Well, maybe that’s a bit of an exaggeration. But it’s definitely relaxing.

I now have to buy an adapter so that I can connect my cameras to the telescope. Therefore the picture of the moon is not from the telescope lens, but from my 300mm Tokina.

 Moon

Moon

My painted Nikon D70

In one of the last posts I wrote that you can’t remove the part around the bayonet for painting the camera, because the A/M lever can’t be detached. That was wrong. It can be removed. To do this, use a scalpel or other flat pointed object to tear open a small cover in the middle of the lever. After that, a screw comes to light. Loosen it and voilĂ  – the part can be lifted off for coloring without any problems.

I did this on another D70 and colored it red with spray paint. Here is the result:

 
Painted Nikon

Painted Nikon

Painted Nikon