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Digital Kodak EIR featuring Nikon

Today I had to break new ground (for me) to get a bit closer to my goal – to create a more authentic digital Kodak EIR “Aerochrome”. My experiments with Sigma, especially regarding details like the color change from red to yellow, were disappointing recently. So, I grabbed my Nikon and went out. The vegetation is anything but super now. But I was pleasantly surprised.

Here is the equipment for the experiment:
Nikon D7100 Full spectrum
Hoya X1 Green
Tiffen 16 Orange (or Yellow)
Hot Mirror Kolari
B+W 830nm filter
Polarizer (Neewer)

First I tried the two-photo method with one image with visible light only, and one image with IR only. For this I used the Hot Mirror and the B+W filter. This was OK for me. Here is the result. Yes, yellow taillights, red vegetation, but the red car in the background was caramel colored (maybe it’s the perspective though). These images were just processed with the color channel method, no additional reworking…

digital Kodak EIR

digital Kodak EIR

digital Kodak EIR

 
Then with only orange filter and polarizer. The reds are too pale. Again, no reworking, just the channels:

Aerochrome emulation

 
Finally, I tried what was my greatest hope: the combination of green filter and orange filter (plus polarizer). I am quite happy with it. The red car is bright yellow, the vegetation is already good (for the season). The following are also straight out of the channel mixing, no reworking:

digital Kodak EIR

digital Kodak EIR

digital Kodak EIR

 
Those were reworked minimally via raw converter (hues and contrast and vintage preset filter and some grain):

digital Kodak EIR

digital Kodak EIR

digital Kodak EIR

 
This is probably a good method to achieve a digital Kodak EIR, because the X1 is known for differentiating vegetation very well, and it does a cutoff in the infrared spectrum.

So how is it done exactly? Stack green and orange filter. Do a custom white balance on grey asphalt or white card. Shoot. Then open Photoshop, further optimize white balance, then do the channel stuff: Duplicate red and green channels, copy the blue channel, paste blue channel into red channel, then copy the duplicated red channel, paste into green channel, then copy the duplicated green channel and paste it into the blue channel. That’s it. It’s all one image, one exposure!

Essentially it is this (link), but without subtracting IR from the channels…

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